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Do I qualify?

Do I qualify for a bus pass?

Bus passes are available for older North Lincolnshire residents or those with qualifying disabilities.

If you are unable to use public transport on your own because of a disability, you may apply for a companion to be added to your pass to help you on your journey.

Entitlement by age

If you are applying for a pass on the grounds of age you will require proof of the following:
• Your date of birth - this can be a birth certificate, driving licence, passport or other document showing your birth date.
• Your address - this must be an official letter addressed to yourself at your current address, for example a bank statement, a utility bill or a recent council tax bill.

Please select the date range in which your date of birth falls, to find out when you will be eligible for a bus pass.

If your birthday falls before the dates shown below then you are already eligible for a bus pass.

Entitlement by disability

If you have one of the following you will automatically qualify for a concessionary pass:

  • DLA (Disability Living Allowance) letter issued within the last 12 months showing high rate mobility
  • PIP (Personal Independence Payment) letter issued within the last 12 months showing at least eight points against either the 'Moving Around' and or 'Communicating Verbally' activities. The whole of the letter must be brought as proof in order that these can be seen.
  • WPMS  - War Pensioner's Mobility Supplement
  • Blue Badge
  • Certificate of Registration from Adult Social Services - Ironstone Centre (showing blind or partially sighted, dual sensory loss, deaf without speech, learning disability)
  • Letter revoking Driving Licence - see Category G below

Concessionary passes issued on the above evidence will be issued for five years or until the period end date on the evidence provided.

We CANNOT accept the following types of evidence:

  • PIP award of mobility component with only four points against the 'Moving Around' activity
  • DLA Mobility component at the lower rate
  • DLA Daily Living only component at any level
  • Letter which lists medical conditions
  • Letter which says your mobility is affected by a medical condition
  • Letter which says you would benefit from having a bus pass
  • Letter which asks for you to be considered for a bus pass because you need one

There are seven types of disability that are recognised by the scheme and you must fit into one of them to qualify for a concessionary pass.  These categories are listed below.  Your disability must be either permanent or likely to last at least 12 months.

A person is eligible for a concessionary bus pass if they are blind (severely sight impaired) or partially sighted (sight impaired).

Blind (severely sight impaired)- A high degree of vision loss, seeing much less than is normal or perhaps nothing at all. 

Partially Sighted (sight impaired) – A less severe loss of vision.  A person who can see more than someone who is blind, but less than a fully sighted person

In general terms a person can be registered as blind, or severely sight impaired, if they cannot see (with glasses, if worn) the top letter of the eye test chart (used by doctors and opticians) at a distance of 3 metres or less.  Some people, who can read the top letter of an eye test chart at 3 metres, but not at 6 metres, may still be eligible for registration as blind if their field of vision is also severely restricted.

A person can be registered as partially sighted, or sight impaired, if they have a full field of vision but can only read the top letter of the eye test chart at a distance of 6 metres or less (with glasses, if worn).  However, if they can read the next three lines down at the same distance, but the field of vision is either moderately or severely restricted, they may still qualify for registration.

You WILL be eligible if:

  • You are registered, or entitled to be registered, as blind or severely sight impaired

or

  • You are registered or entitled to be registered, as partially sighted or sight impaired

You WILL NOT be eligible if: 

  • You are not entitled to be registered 

You can prove that you are eligible by providing one of the following:

  • One of the automatic eligibility proofs in the list before this category
  • Social Services Certificate of Registration showing either blind, partially sighted or dual sensory loss
  • Certificate of Visual Impairment signed by a Consultant Ophthalmologist
  • Letter from an eye specialist, for example an optometrist, stating that you would qualify to be registered as blind or partially sighted

Guidance from the Department of Transport states that hearing loss is measured in decibels across the normal hearing spectrum as dBHL (Hearing Level).  Hearing loss is usually graded as follows:

• 25 to 39 dBHL: mild, cannot hear whispers
• 40 to 69 dBHL: moderate, cannot hear conversational speech
• 70 to 94 dBHL: severe, cannot hear shouting
• More than 95 dBHL: profound, cannot hear sounds that would be painful for a hearing person to listen to

The hearing loss must be in both ears.

You WILL be eligible if your hearing loss is severe or profound, for example, greater than 70 dBHL in both ears.

You WILL NOT be eligible if your hearing loss is mild or moderate, for example, 69 dBHL or less in your better ear. 

You can prove that you are eligible by providing one of the following:

  • Social Services Certificate of Registration showing deaf or dual sensory loss
  • Letter from an aural specialist stating that you have hearing loss of 70dB or more in both ears
  • Audiological report showing the average hearing loss of both ears is over 70dB (some shop reports might not show this)
  • One of the automatic proofs listed before these categories

You WILL be eligible if you are unable to communicate orally in any language. For example, you are unable to make clear basic oral requests or you are unable to ask specific questions to clarify instructions

You WILL NOT be eligible if you have speech but it is slow or difficult to understand. For example, if you have a severe stammer or you cannot speak English but you do speak another language. 

You can prove that you are eligible by providing one of the following:

  • One of the automatic proofs listed before these categories
  • Letter from social services or another appropriate organisation providing support services stating that you are without speech
  • For a child, a Statement of Special Education Needs (SEN) or Educational Health Care Plan (EHCP)
  • Documents which demonstrate that you are without speech.  These may include letters from your consultant or GP which you may already have in your possession.

A person is eligible for a concessionary bus pass if they have a long term and substantial disability that means they cannot walk or which makes walking very difficult.  Your disability must be likely to last at least 12 months.

You WILL be eligible if:

  • You are unable to walk at all
  • You can only get about by swinging through crutches (long term)
  • You are unable to walk more than 64 metres without severe discomfort
  • It takes an excessive amount of time to walk a short distance, for example five minutes to walk 100 metres
  • The exertion required to walk would constitute a danger to your life or would be likely to lead to serious deterioration in your health

You WILL NOT be if your mobility problems are likely to last less than 12 months.

You can prove that you are eligible by providing one of the following:

  • One of the automatic proofs listed before these categories
  • Letter including one of the above eligibility statements.  This must be from a medical professional (other than a GP) who has you under their care, for example physiotherapist or consultant. Any letter that is provided as evidence should describe your disability so that it is possible to see whether any of the above criteria applies to you. It should also state whether your disability is permanent or temporary and, if temporary, it should state the expected duration.

Please be aware that a medical professional is not obliged to provide a letter and as this is a private service you may be charged.

You are eligible for a concessionary bus pass if you do not have arms, or if you are unable to use both your arms for a long time. You are also eligible if you are missing one or both of your lower limbs.

You WILL be eligible if:

  • You have both arms but are unable to use them to carry out day to day tasks
  • You have a limb reduction deficiency in one or more arms or legs
  • You have an upper or lower limb amputation
  • You have a medical condition (muscular dystrophy, spinal cord injury, motor neurone disease or condition of comparable severity) which affects the use of your arms or legs

You WILL NOT be if your mobility problems are likely to last less than 12 months. 

You can prove that you are eligible by providing one of the following:

  • One of the automatic proofs listed before these categories
  • If you apply in person and it is shown that you are without arms, or without hands, or without a lower limb, or are using a prosthetic then documentary evidence is not necessary
  • Documents which demonstrate that you have lost the use of your arms or legs over the long term (12 months or more).  This can include letters from your consultant or from the Limbless Clinic in Hull
  • Any letter that is provided as evidence should describe your disability so that it is possible to see whether any of the above criteria applies to you.  It should also state whether your disability is permanent or temporary and, if temporary, it should state the expected duration

Please be aware that a medical professional is not obliged to provide a letter and as this is a private service you may be charged. 

A person is eligible for a concessionary bus pass if they have a learning disability as defined by the Transport Act 2000.

Guidelines for concessionary travel defines 'learning disability' in this way:

A person with a learning disability has a reduced ability to understand new or complex information, a difficulty in learning new skills and may be unable to cope independently. These disabilities must have started before adulthood and have a lasting effect on development. The person should be able to qualify for specialist services and he or she may have had special educational provision.

The Department of Health adopted the term 'learning disability' in 1992. It has the same meaning as its predecessor 'mental handicap' but it is seen as more acceptable, particularly in reducing the confusion with mental illness.

You WILL be eligible if you have a learning disability which includes significant impairment of intelligence and social functioning. This includes Downs Syndrome, some autistic spectrum disorders and other learning disabilities which mean that you have difficulty in understanding new and complex information, have difficulty learning new skills and may not be able to cope independently.

You WILL NOT be eligible if:

  • You have dyslexia, dyspraxia or attention deficit disorder - these would not qualify as 'significant impairment of intelligence and social functioning'
  • Your intelligence is not impaired, even if your disability affects your social functioning
  • You are applying because of mental health problems
  • Your condition started after you became and adult, for example, brain injury

Note: If your condition prevents you from holding a driving licence you may still qualify for a concessionary pass under category G. Please see this section for more details. 

You can prove that you are eligible by providing one of the following:

  • One of the automatic proofs listed before these categories
  • Letter from Social Services or other organisation providing support services stating that you have autism, Asperger's syndrome or learning disability
  • Letter from the manager of a residential home or sheltered accommodation where you are resident stating that you have autism, Asperger's syndrome or learning disability. This letter must be on headed paper.
  • For a child: a Statement of Educational Needs (SEN) or Educational Health Care Plan (EHCP), a letter from the head of a special school where they are studying, or a letter from a learning disability co-ordinator at a mainstream school or college where they are studying

Any letter provided as evidence must state that you have a state of arrested or incomplete development of mind which includes significant impairment of intelligence and social functioning.

Under Section 92 of the Road Traffic Act 1988 you may be refused a driving licence on the grounds of your medical fitness. Those currently barred from holding a driving licence include people with:

  • Epilepsy (unless it is a type which does not pose a danger)
  • Severe mental disorder
  • Liability to sudden attacks of giddiness or fainting
  • Inability to read a registration plate in good light at 20.5 metres (with lenses if worn)
  • Other disabilities which are likely to cause the driving of vehicles by them to be a source of danger to the public

You WILL be eligible if:

  • You have had an epileptic attack within the last 12 months
  • You have a history of epileptic attacks when asleep and have had one whilst awake within the last 3 years
  • You are diabetic and have suffered a hypoglycaemic attack requiring the assistance of another person within the last 12 months
  • You have a severe mental disorder which means that you would be refused a driving licence or have your driving licence revoked
  • You cannot read a vehicle registration plate in good light 20.5 meters (with lenses)
  • You are liable to sudden attacks of giddiness or fainting
  • You have another medical condition which means that you would be refused a driving licence or have your driving licence revoked

You WILL NOT be eligible if:

  • You are refused a driving licence as a result of drug or alcohol misuse
  • You are allowed to keep your driving licence but you have been advised not to drive for the sake of your health, for example, you may be recovering from surgery or driving would worsen your medical condition
  • You are unable to drive short term (less than 12 months) but the surrender of your driving licence is not required
  • The side effects of the medication that you are taking prevents you from driving (unless your driving licence has been revoked or refused because of it)
  • You suffer from mental health issues, such as anxiety or depression, which would not cause you to be refused a driving licence
  • You have a condition that is life-limiting or a serious illness, unless, as a result of these you are at risk of seizures

You can prove that you are eligible by providing one of the following:

  • A letter, dated within the last 12 months, from the DVLA stating that your licence has been refused or revoked
  • A letter, dated within the last 12 months, from a consultant or other medical professional, for example, qualified mental health practitioner, which confirms that the applicant would be refused a driving licence on medical grounds (other than because of misuse of alcohol or drugs)
  • One of the automatic proofs listed before these categories

Companion's element

A companion element can be added to a disabled persons pass if you are unable to use public transport on your own at any time.

The disabled person’s pass will show a '+C' symbol in the top right hand corner. The companion may travel free on local buses within North Lincolnshire and journeys which start in North Lincolnshire and end elsewhere. The companion may also travel back free from places in North East Lincolnshire, Hull, the East Riding of Yorkshire and South Yorkshire. They are NOT able to travel back free from Lincolnshire.

Companions may buy half fare return tickets for local rail journeys or single tickets at one-third off.

We do not provide a companion’s entitlement for disabled children under 12 years of age.

How can I apply to have a companion entitlement added to my pass?

You are automatically eligible for the companion element if:

  • your Disability Living Allowance letter shows you are eligible for high rate mobility and high rate care or high rate care only, or, 
  • your Personal Independence Payment letter shows that you are eligible for enhanced mobility and enhanced daily living or enhanced daily living only.        

Take your letter into Shopmobility or to your nearest Local Link and it can be requested. You are also automatically eligible for the companion element if you are registered as being blind or having dual sensory loss.

If you don't automatically qualify for the companion element then you will need a letter from your consultant or specialist stating that you require, at all times, when using public transport physical assistance onto or off the bus, or you need assistance at all times when managing the journey while using public transport.  If you require any further information then you can call us on  01724 297460.  A letter from your consultant or specialist will be needed for future renewals, unless the consultant or specialist states that you are unlikely to recover from your disability. 

If you need any further information please contact us. 

Contact details

public.transport@northlincs.gov.uk
01724 297460

Public Transport
Hewson House
Brigg
DN20 8XQ

Opening hours

Monday to Thursday: 8.30am to 5pm

Friday: 8.30am to 4.30pm

Last updated: 21/10/2016
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